Pickled Carrots with Dill and Garlic

Pickled Carrots with Dill and Garlic - Dish 'n' the Kitchen A Jar of bright carrots, fresh dill, and garlic fill a jar surrounded by more fresh dill and garlic.

Small batch preserving these Pickled Carrots is easier than you think. Grow your own or buy carrots in season, then pickle them with dill and garlic for a dillicious treat!

Starting from Scratch in a New City

We moved to Calgary in 1998 when our daughter Julia was 3 weeks old. New city, new baby, new house, new job…it was a huge step for us. We had a tiny starter home (my mother’s garden was larger than the main floor of this house!)with a modest yard. There was just enough space for the kids to play and to have a small veggie garden.

Begin With Baby Steps

It was there that I learned that gardening is much different in Calgary that it is in Saskatchewan. The shorter summer season sometimes makes it quite tricky to produce a decent yield. I started out small by growing the simple things: Peas, Beans, Lettuce, and Carrots.

Pickled Carrots with Dill and Garlic - Dish 'n' the Kitchen Bright orange carrots ready for pickling.

Necessity is the Mother of Invention

It just so happened that my very first harvest from that garden coincided with Julia’s first birthday. She was a breastfed baby and picky with solid food right from the start. She wouldn’t eat baby food (I think it was a textural thing) so she went straight from milk to these solids: toast, yoghurt, and pickles. What a fun combination!

When In Doubt, Pickle Everything! 

I’ll never know how she developed normally on this diet but children have a way of surviving, I guess. In order to keep up with her incessant demand for pickles I pickled everything I could from that first garden harvest. The Pickled Carrots and Beans were a bit hit with Miss Julia and the rest of the family.

Pickled Carrots with Dill and Garlic - Dish 'n' the Kitchen A half packed jar of bright carrots, fresh dill, and garlic surrounded by more fresh dill and garlic.

Pickled Carrots – A Family Tradition

Julia eventually grew out of her pickles and yogurt phase but the family still requests Pickled Carrots on occasion. Our youngest son (who has an amazing appetite and has always eaten everything in sight) has moved away from home for the first time. It’s our first taste of an ’empty nest’ and I hate it. I know it’s not empty for long because football season wraps up at the end of October.

Craving Pickled Carrots

In the meantime, I asked him if he needed any provisions while away from home. Even though he’s a decent cook and gets a lot of food from the butcher shop where he works, he still craves a taste of home. I wasn’t surprised when he requested some Pickled Carrots.

Pickled Carrots with Dill and Garlic - Dish 'n' the Kitchen A large canner filled with boiling hot water and jars of pickled carrots.

How to Choose the Best Carrots 

You don’t need to grow your own carrots for this recipe. However, I suggest buying the fresh, young carrots (with a diameter of around 1 cm) from your local farmer’s market. If you must use larger carrots, make sure they don’t taste ‘old’, give them a good peel and quarter them length ways.

Helpful Hints For Pickled Carrots

Cutting them this way will make it possible to pack them tightly in the jar. Measure how long they need to be using one of your pint jars and cut them all to size at once. Lastly, having everything (carrots, dill, dill seed, garlic, hot brine) ready and waiting for when it’s time to pack the jars is key.

Pickled Carrots with Dill and Garlic - Dish 'n' the Kitchen Bright carrots lined up and cut to size for pickling.

Pin This Pickled Carrots with Dill and Garlic Recipe HERE.

Pickled Carrots with Dill and Garlic - Dish 'n' the Kitchen Pin image of three jars of bright carrots, fresh dill, and garlic fill a jar surrounded by more fresh dill and garlic.

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Pickled Carrots with Dill and Garlic - Dish 'n' the Kitchen A Jar of bright carrots, fresh dill, and garlic fill a jar surrounded by more fresh dill and garlic.

 

Yield: 5 - 500ml Jars

Pickled Carrots with Dill and Garlic

Pickled Carrots with Dill and Garlic

Small batch preserving Pickled Carrots is easier than you think. Grow your own or buy carrots in season, then pickle them with dill and garlic for a dill-icious treat!

Prep Time 1 hour
Cook Time 20 minutes
Total Time 1 hour 20 minutes

Ingredients

FOR THE BRINE

  • 4 cups water
  • 4 cups white vinegar 
  • 1/2 cup salt (pickling salt or sea salt)

FOR THE JARS

  • 6 lbs baby carrots; scrubbed or regular carrots; peeled
  • 5 cloves garlic; peeled and cut in half lengthwise
  • 1 tbsp dill seed
  • 5 heads of flowering fresh dill

Instructions

    1. Fill a hot water bath canner (with a canning rack) with water and bring to a boil while you:
    2. Scrub and trim baby carrots to fit a pint jar. Peel, trim, and quarter mature carrots length ways.
    3. Wash and inspect 6 pint jars (I always do an extra jar just in case) and their lids. Be sure there are no chips on the jar rims and that there's no rust or dents on the lids.
    4. Place jars upside down in a large cake pan, add an inch or two of water. Place in a 250 F oven for ten minutes and keep warm until you are ready to fill them.
    5. Place lids and lid rings into a pot and fill with water. Set on stove and heat until they just begin to boil.
    6. Fill a kettle with water and bring to a boil.
    7. Add water, vinegar, and salt to a medium pot. Bring to a boil so that the salt dissolves.
    8. Clean and prep garlic and dill.
    9. Take jars out of the oven one at a time and add one half of garlic followed by a flowering dill head.
    10. Quickly but purposefully arrange the carrots in the pint jar until the are so tightly packed you can't add any more.
    11. Ram another garlic half into the carrots, then add a pinch of dill seed. Top with hot brine, leaving 1 cm head space.
    12. Quickly cover with hot lid and screw on the sealing ring until it's just tight, but not crazy tight.
    13. Place jar in canning rack and repeat until all your jars are finished. If your hot water canner looks too full of boiling water, remove some. If you need more, take it from the kettle.
    14. Lower the canning rack into the canner. Make sure there's an inch of water above the jars.
    15. Process at a rolling boil for 10 minutes at sea level or 20 minutes at over 3000 ft altitude (or see hot water processing chart HERE), adding boiling water as needed to make sure the jars are covered.
    16. Remove and let sit on counter overnight before moving. Check to make sure all jars have sealed (the lids should be depressed in their centres) and refrigerate any that have not sealed.
    17. Allow pickles to sit in the brine for a few weeks. Enjoy!
Small batch canning is easier than you think. Follow my simple steps and make your own Dill-icious Pickled Carrots with Dill and Garlic.

16 comments

  1. Theresa

    Hi. Just double checking if it supposed to be 1/2 c salt and not tablespoon. Getting ready to make brine now. Excited!

    Reply

    1. Bernice Hill

      You betcha! It’s supposed to be salty as it’s a brine.

      Reply

  2. Cody

    What is the best way to store these? Should they be kept in a cool area or a fridge? How long before they expire?

    Reply

    1. Bernice Hill

      Hi Cody! If the lids have sealed you can store them in a cool basement or a shelf (not in direct sun). No need for a fridge until they are open. They’ll be good properly stored for a year, or more. As with all canning, if the colour changes or gets cloudy, or if there’s an odd smell then discard is best.

      Reply

      1. Mandy Mayer

        Although if you cut your garlic lengthwise the brine will get cloudy. If you leave the garlic clove intact, it won’t!

        Reply

        1. Bernice Hill

          Interesting. I’ve never had that issue. Are you absolutely sure? Cloudy brine could result from many things.

          Reply

  3. Jocelyne

    are you putting raw cold carrots in the jars? I thought everything canned needed to be hot.

    Reply

    1. Bernice Hill

      The jars are 250 F, the brine is boiling. I do put cold carrots in the jars as well as garlic and dill. I pack the jars quickly and set them in the boiling canner. Some people may blanche the carrots first but I never have (same with pickling cucumbers). The carrots sealed perfectly and look the same today as they did when I did this batch.

      Reply

  4. Courtney

    My garlic burst when I took the jar out of the canner, why would this be?

    Reply

    1. Bernice Hill

      I don’t really understand what you mean? Your garlic burst? Feel free to send a photo via email since you can’t do it here.

      Reply

  5. Laurette

    What size jars did you use?

    Reply

    1. Bernice Hill

      Hi Laurette, I used 500 ml jars.

      Reply

  6. Craig

    I’m so glad I found your site, I made beets and carrots yesterday and they look awesome. Thanks to your direction. I didn’t have any mason jars but went ahead and used large store bought pickle jars. And once we had eaten all the pickles I use these.
    Is this going to be ok?

    Reply

    1. Bernice Hill

      Hi Craig. Believe it or not, my mother used to do the same thing. The commercial lids do have rubber underneath and they will seal. Just keep an eye on them to make sure they stay sealed. If they turn colour or get fizzy, or have a strong odour, don’t eat them.

      Reply

  7. Kim

    I want to do some dilled carrots, but not crazy about the salt for a sodium reduced diet. I am thinking they would sill be fine if I reduced the salt?

    Reply

    1. Bernice Hill

      It’s up to you Kim. You can try reducing the salt to 1/3 cup, however, in pickling salt does more than heighten flavour. It also physically allows flavours to penetrate the carrots. If you do reduce the salt, keep in mind that your brine will not taste as I’ve intended in this recipe and it will take longer for your carrots to fully pickle. Just a thought, pickles by their very nature are salty. When you are eating them, you eat them with a meal or other food and you don’t eat a lot at the same time. If you do try to reduce the salt to 1/3 cup please let me know how it goes.

      Reply

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