Lemon Herb Dry Brine Chicken Recipe

Dry Brine Chicken - A perfectly browned and roasted whole chicken sits on top of a bed of herbs.

Dry Brine Chicken begins with a bright lemon herb dry brine and ends with a mouthwatering, super moist roast chicken. There’s so much flavour, you’ll never buy a rotisserie chicken again. 

Lemon Herb Dry Brine Chicken

Have you ever wanted to learn how to dry brine a chicken? This post will give you all the salty details on how to make the BEST ROAST CHICKEN EVER. I’ve used a wet brine for both turkey and pork but for the tastiest roast chicken, it’s go dry or go home. Up your roast chicken game by making the juiciest, home cooked chicken for your family using this simple dry brine recipe.

Dry Brine Chicken - A perfectly browned and roasted whole chicken sits inside a roasting pan.

What is a Dry Brine?

A dry brine is a simple coating of salt (and sometimes dry herbs and citrus zest) that is rubbed into the surface of a protein. Over time, the salt draws moisture away from the surface and locks it into the meat. This technique will result in a juicy roast chicken with amazing crispy skin.

Dry Brine Chicken - A green basalt mortar containing citrus herb dry rub and a pestle.

Battle of the Brines

So which brine is the right brine to use? It actually depends what job you are using it for. A wet brine is much more involved that a dry brine but it works best for turkey. If you have the time and space, boiling up the brine then cooling it is worth it because it will actually ADD moisture and flavour to your turkey. Herbs, citrus (both juice and zest), spices, and aromatics can all be added to add oomph to the wet brine

A dry brine works best when you are shorter on time and space. It’s simpler in flavour, but results in a moist bird with ultra crispy skin and minimal clean-up. The brine can be mixed up in a flash and there’s no boiling or cooling. A dry brine seals the moisture in the meat and provides a barrier to its escape.

Dry Brine Chicken - A hand holds a small white bowl containing lemon herb dry rub with a raw chicken sitting in the background.

How to Dry Brine Chicken

This dry brine chicken is fairly straightforward. Begin with the best roasting chicken you can find. I used a meaty 2 lb local Hutterite chicken and the quality really outshines any grocery store roasting chicken. 

Next, place the salt, fresh herbs, and lemon zest inside a mortar. Bash them around for a minute with the pestle so that the salt picks up all that wonderful herb and citrus flavour. Add the lemon juice and olive oil. Stuff the chicken cavity with fresh herbs and half a lemon.

Separate the skin over the breasts by carefully inserting your hand under the skin and gently pushing through the connecting tissue. Try not to tear the skin but it’s not the end of the world if it happens (see photo!). Rub 1/4 of the dry brine on one breast under the skin, then repeat with the other breast.

Pat the chicken dry with a paper towel and truss it up. Trussing the chicken creates a nice tight chicken and keeps the legs from separating from the body during roasting. 

Dry Brine Chicken - A whole herb covered chicken sits inside a roasting pan.

How Does a Dry Brine Work?

After the chicken is trussed and dried, rub the rest of the dry brine over the whole chicken. Place it on a rack over a plate or roasting pan so that that air can circulate freely around the bird. Leave it in the fridge for at least 4 hours though 24 hours is ideal. During this time, the surface of the chicken loses moisture in two ways:

  1. Through evaporation into the cold, dry refrigerator. 
  2. The salt pulls the water away from the skin and into the meat.

After 24 hours, remove the chicken from the fridge. Don’t panic. It will look like it has a sunburn and that is the effect you want. That dry skin is going to seal all the juices inside the chicken while it’s roasting. Even better? It’s gonna get crispy, baby!

Dry Brine Chicken - A whole herb covered chicken sits inside a roasting pan.

How Long Can You Dry Brine a Chicken?

Great news! A chicken doesn’t have to be dry brined overnight. Prep it right away in the morning and leave the chicken drying in the fridge until dinner time. After four hours of dry brining you’ll see a difference but the ideal time to let your bird dry brine is 24 hours. This longer time ensures the most flavourful chicken with the crispiest skin.

Dry Brine Chicken - A perfectly browned and roasted whole chicken sits inside a roasting pan.

Which Salt to Use for Dry Brine Chicken

Many recipes call for kosher salt because it has large flakes and a coarse texture. The structure makes it easy to rub into the skin while also dissolving readily the process. Please note that all brands of kosher salt are not created equal. Some have much denser grains than others, so be sure to double check the measurements according to brand.

Some sea salts may also be used in dry brine as long as they have a delicate, flaky texture that crumbles easily. In this recipe, I used sel gris.

You CAN use regular table salt but it’s not recommended as it can easily clump together, causing uneven brine distribution.

Dry Brine Chicken - A perfectly browned and roasted whole chicken sits inside a roasting pan.

How to Roast a Dry Brine Chicken

If the chicken was dry brined on a rack over a shallow roasting pan, use the same pan for roasting. Remove the chicken from the fridge and let it come up to room temperature while the oven is pre-heating to 425 F. Roast, uncovered, for 30 minutes.

Then, lower the temperature to 375 F. Roast the chicken for another 45 minutes, then use a thermometer inserted into the deepest part of the thigh to test the temperature. The chicken is done when it reaches an internal temperature of 165 F. 

Dry Brine Chicken - A perfectly browned and roasted chicken surrounded by herbs with a slice of breast meat removed.

Dry Brine Chicken Inspiration

A chef friend once told me that if they were going to serve a simple roast chicken, they would make it the best roast chicken their customer had ever had. This got me to thinking about all the chickens I’ve roasted and how my methods have evolved over the years. 

The first chickens I roasted were seasoned with salt and pepper then roasted in closed oval roaster at 350 F. While this method got the job done, it usually produced a pale skinned chicken that was somehow almost always over cooked.

Next, I tried an open roast method with butter and herbs at a higher temperature. This method produces a wonderful chicken on it’s own, but is all that butter really necessary?

Finally, I have found the best roast chicken method yet; Dry Brine Chicken. This method produces the best roast chicken I have ever had. Mission accomplished!

Pin this Lemon Herb Dry Brine Chicken Recipe HERE. 

Dry Brine Chicken - Pinterest image of a perfectly browned and roasted whole chicken sitting inside a roasting pan.

Yield: 1 chicken

Lemon Herb Dry Brine Chicken Recipe

Lemon Herb Dry Brine Chicken Recipe

This amazing Dry Brine Chicken begins with a bright lemon herb dry brine and ends with a mouthwatering super moist roasted chicken. There's so much flavour, you'll never buy a rotisserie chicken again.

Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 2 hours
Additional Time 1 days
Total Time 1 days 2 hours 15 minutes

Ingredients

  • 2 1/2 tbsp sel gris
  • 1 lemon; zested and one half of it juiced (reserve other half)
  • 1 tsp olive oil 
  • 2 tsp fresh thyme leaves
  • 2 tsp fresh rosemary leaves; finely chopped
  • 1 whole chicken approximately 2 lbs.

Instructions

  1. Mix salt, thyme, rosemary, olive oil, and juice from half a lemon together in a small bowl.
  2. Loosen the skin covering the chicken breast by carefully sliding your hand underneath. Be very careful not to tear it.
  3. Pat the entire chicken dry with a paper towel.
  4. Rub 1/4 of the dry brine on one breast under the skin, then repeat with the other breast.
  5. Place a handful of fresh thyme and half a lemon into the chicken.
  6. Tie the chicken up with kitchen string (check youtube for a video).
  7. Rub the rest of the dry brine all over the chicken.
  8. Place the chicken in the fridge on a baking tray with a wire rack. Allow to dry for 24 hours.
  9. Remove the chicken from the fridge and allow to come to room temperature as the oven pre-heats to 425 F.
  10. Roast the chicken at 425 F for 30 minutes then reduce time to 375 F.
  11. Roast for another 60-90 minutes or until the internal temperature reaches 180 F in the thickest part of the thigh (without touching the bone)

Nutrition Information:

Yield:

6

Serving Size:

1

Amount Per Serving:Calories: 369Total Fat: 21gSaturated Fat: 6gTrans Fat: 0gUnsaturated Fat: 13gCholesterol: 133mgSodium: 124mgCarbohydrates: 0gFiber: 0gSugar: 0gProtein: 41g

Nutritional calculation was provided by Nutritionix and is an estimation only. For special diets or medical issues please use your preferred calculator.

26 comments

  1. Lisa

    Dry brined chicken is my favorite way to roast chicken! This looks delicious!

    Reply

    1. Bernice Hill

      It just really makes such a difference!

      Reply

  2. Sharon

    The brine for this chicken will make sure that it is so juicy and tender. Then the lemon adds a whole new level of flavor.

    Reply

    1. Bernice Hill

      It sure does. Thanks for stopping by Sharon.

      Reply

  3. Analida Braeger

    Thanks for all the detailed instructions and I like that you share why this technique works and it is the best I have found while searching online. Thanks so much!

    Reply

    1. Bernice Hill

      You are so welcome. Please come back and let me know how it went.

      Reply

  4. GUNJAN C Dudani

    What a wonderful recipe. It surely looks tempting. I love all the ingredients and the way you have explained the steps. Definitely making this soon.

    Reply

  5. Paula Montenegro

    I’m so excited to try this recipe over the weekend! I never brined a chicken this way, with a stay in the refrigerator, but it looks absolutely stunning and crisp! Thanks for sharing.

    Reply

    1. Bernice Hill

      Love it. Hope you really enjoy the experience.

      Reply

  6. Amanda

    This truly makes one wonderful roast chicken! That brine is incredibly flavorful, and everyone loved it. Perfect for company or a just a weeknight.

    Reply

    1. Bernice Hill

      Yes! I can’t wait to have some friends over and make them this chicken.

      Reply

  7. Pam Greer

    This really does make the perfect roast chicken! Juicy on the inside and skin so crispy people will fight over it!

    Reply

    1. Bernice Hill

      You got it! There was a bit of fighting over here when this chicken came out of the oven.

      Reply

  8. Matt - Total Feasts

    I’m roasting a Chicken tomorrow for the family, totally going to give this try!

    Reply

    1. Bernice Hill

      Enjoy Matt…it’s a total feast! 😉

      Reply

  9. Kristen

    So interesting, I’ve never tried this method. I do something similar but I always have chicken stock in the bottom of the pan. I’ll have to give this a try.

    Reply

    1. Bernice Hill

      I used to have stock in the pan too. This recipe produces a lot of delcious browned chicken pan bits. I add boiling water later for gravy making.

      Reply

  10. Leslie

    Great recipe here!. This is such a classic recipe to keep on hand. Great recipe for so many meals!

    Reply

    1. Bernice Hill

      It sure is. Thanks for stopping by Leslie.

      Reply

  11. Tara

    This chicken recipe is juicy and flavorful. Perfect for dinner and leftovers like sandwiches. I plan to make it often.

    Reply

    1. Bernice Hill

      Yes, worth it to make 2 just for the leftovers.

      Reply

  12. Terri

    I had no idea this was even a thing! I’m definitely trying it -yummy!

    Reply

    1. Bernice Hill

      It is!! I’m never looking back now…

      Reply

  13. Aline

    Everyone needs a good roast chicken recipe, and this brine is everything!!!!!!!!!! So good!! Thank you!

    Reply

    1. Bernice Hill

      Thank you Aline, I hope you enjoy it.

      Reply

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